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Mayespark Primary School

Mayespark Primary School

Dream, Explore, Discover

Reading at home

Key Stage 1:

 

Help children to enjoy reading each day by making it part of their daily routine.  Choose a time of day when you and your child are not too tired, and remember that a short daily session is better than an occasional long one.  As often as you can, make a note in your child's reading record book of your comments on the reading session - your child's achievements will soon become apparent.

Where?

Find a comfortable place where you can enjoy reading together.  Background noise, such as TV or other family members chatting, can be very distracting.  Try to go somewhere where you won't be disturbed.

Top tips

  • Try to keep the reading sessions fun and relaxed - bring the stories to life with different voices for characters, or use a soft toy as a prop.
  • Encourage children to read with different people and talk about what they are reading.
  • Help your child to read in different environments by pointing out signs, posters, packets and labels.
  • Ask your child to spot words they know in games, comics and magazines, and to use their phonics to help them work out any tricky words.
  • Join to library and allow your child to choose their own books.  Follow their interests - books and magazines that appeal to them will help them develop a lifelong love of reading.
  • Your child is being taught to read systematically at school, but at home you can help them turn reading in to a habit.  Keep reading to your child even after they have learned to read independently, as well as listening to them read.  Let them see you reading for pleasure too.
  • It is hard work learning to read.  Keep praising your child, especially when they are finding reading difficult.  If a reading session gets stressful, stop, and try again the next day.

Key Stage 2:

Help children to enjoy reading each day by making it part of their daily routine.  Choose a time of day when you and your child are not too tired, and remember that a short daily session is better than an occasional long one.  As far as possible, go along with your child's wishes about where and when they read.

Reading aloud or reading silently?

During Key Stage 2, your child will develop their reading skills and become increasingly fluent and independent in reading.  As your child gains fluency, their silent reading will improve and become faster, so give them lots of opportunities to read by themselves.  If your child is reading silently, ask them questions about the book and discuss it.  This way you will get a sense of whether they fully understand what they read.  It is also helpful to ask your child to read aloud to you, so that you can see whether they are able to manage the text independently.  If you occasionally sample the child's reading like this, you will find it easier to talk about the book with them.

Top tips

  • Try to make sure that reading is fun and relaxing.  Encourage your child to find somewhere comfortable and quiet to read, so that they can really get absorbed in the book, without too many distractions.
  • Encourage children to read with different people and talk about their books. 
  • Join the library and allow your child to choose their own books.  Follow their interests - books and magazines that appeal to them will help them develop a life long love of reading.
  • Recipes, food packets, leaflets, newspapers and magazines, as well as books, offer useful practice in reading.
  • Your child is being taught to read systematically at school - but at home you can help them turn reading in to a habit.  Keep reading to your child even after they have learned to read independently, as well as listening to them read.  Let them see you reading for pleasure too.
  • Sometimes children become anxious if they are finding reading a struggle.  Try not to pressurise the child too much, and keep praising their efforts, especially when they are finding reading difficult.  If a reading session gets stressful, stop, and try again the next day.  Talk to your child's teacher if you are worried about their reading.